Posts Categorized: Blog

An alternative approach to chronic renal failure

Vets Corner

Chronic Renal Failure is a very serious condition which is common in older cats. But if treated properly there is no reason why your pet can’t live a long and healthy life. Paul Boland looks at its causes and what you can use in terms of alternative treatments. We do not fully understand the underlying causes but it has been suggested that there may be a link with the development of renal failure and the distemper vaccination. It is also thought that it may  be a connected with the ingestion of long term use dry food diets. Sometimes a specific cause of chronic renal failure, such as bacterial infection, can be identified and in these cases its progression can be stopped, however most of the time the causes are not as simply identified as this. What do the Kidneys do? Every day, the kidneys process huge quantities of  waste products and extra water… Read more »

Lumps and bumps on your dog’s paws? It could be interdigital cysts

Vets Corner

Most dog owners fear the worst when they find lumps or bumps on their dog’s paws, but as Paul Boland explains, this isn’t necessarily anything serious. If you’ve noticed lumps that look like a fleshy welt, an ulcerated sore or a hairless bump between your dog’s toes, then it is more than likely your dog has an interdigital cyst. The correct term for this is actually interdigital furuncle as these are very rarely true cysts. First of all I would advise that you get it checked by your vet to ensure its not a cancer, however I am pleased to say you can do something about this. What is an interdigital cyst? Any type of dog can get them however they are more common in breeds such as Labradors, Bulldogs, German Shepherds and Scottish Terriers. Any dog that is overweight also has a predisposition to them as well as any… Read more »

Don’t just accept behavioural changes in your dog as a sign of age

Vets Corner

If you’ve started noticing some strange behavioural changes in your dog don’t just put this down to old age, there may be something you can do about it. Paul Boland looks at what action owners may be able can take. Symptoms like howling at night and messing in the home can be classic signs of Cognitive Dysfunction Syndrome, a condition we see quite regularly now. Cognitive dysfunction used to be just thought of as old dogs syndrome and its only recently been accepted as an actual disease, partly due to the fact that we are managing to keep our pets living longer. But it’s not something that just happens to dogs either as its also seen in cats. Cognition is essentially a function of the brain which allows us to acquire knowledge and understanding through experience and sense. Cognitive ability in animals and humans declines as we age, however if the… Read more »

Is there a natural alternative to chemical wormers?

Vets Corner

Most responsible dog owners will treat their pet for worms, but many are reluctant to use chemical products for fear of unpleasant side-effects. Paul Boland looks at the best way to prevent worms in your dog, as well as some natural remedies and herbal treatments that can be effective. Animals can pick worms up in a number of ways. Common ways to get worms are from ingesting their larvae or eggs from infected faeces, urine or in grass. Many worms are also ingested from food, and fleas can  carry tapeworm eggs. Because even healthy looking animals can carry worms many infected animals don’t show any outward signs. Some obvious signs that you can look out for are worms in the faeces or vomit or around your pets bottom. Other signs would be a sudden loss of weight, increased appetite, general weakness, bottom licking (more than usual) and fur becoming matted, dry… Read more »

Dealing with dog diarrhoea

Vets Corner

Diarrhoea in dogs is such a common problem it’s usually not a case of if it will happen, but rather when it will happen. Here Paul Boland looks at what can cause it, how to tackle it and what you can do to prevent it in the latest of our Vet’s Corner series… Diarrhoea is the passage of loose, unformed faeces. Initially there is normally a large volume of stool and an increased number of bowel movements. In the normal process of digestion, food would normally take about eight hours to pass through the small intestines. During this time, the bulk of the food and 80% of the water would be absorbed. Whatever is left makes its way to the colon and a well-formed stool is deposited. A normal stool contains no mucus, blood, or undigested food. With diarrhoea, food arrives at the rectum in a liquid state which results in a… Read more »